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  • Air Hockey Robot Project (a 3D printer hack)

    Gear  |  Projects
    A surprisingly skilled air hockey robot! Check out the video!
    "This robot moves in 2 directions, can predict the movements of the puck and also decide to block, shoot or a do a combination of both.
    Surprisingly, most of the ‘robotics’ parts are 3D printer left overs, which includes: NEMA17 stepper motors, an Arduino Mega, a RAMPS board, motor drivers, belts, bearings and rods. The bracketry, puck and paddle are all 3D printed. The air hockey table itself was built from scratch using off-the-shelf wood. Two standard 90mm PC fans are all that are responsible for creating the air pressure used to lift the puck. A PS3 camera monitors the action and is literally this robot’s eye in the sky."
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    Sculptures made from plastic dolls

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    Gear  |  Projects
    Freya Jobbins uses plastic doll parts and toys to "create remarkable humanoid assemblages of faces, heads and larger busts."
    "Inspired by Guiseppe Archimboldo and his fruit and vegetable paintings; and other artist's work such as Penny Byrne's ceramic creations, Ron Muek's giant people, Gunther Von Hagen's plastinated corpses, and of course the Toy Story Trilogy, their influences are very obvious in her assemblages."
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    Glyph, “Personal Theater” Goggles

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    It only took four hours for the Glyph, a head-mounted “personal theater” from Avegant, to reach its $250,000 funding goal on Kickstarter. The Glyph($499) is a wearable headset, complete with over-the-ear headphones, uses a new display technology the company called “Virtual Retina Display” The Virtual Retina Display involves no screen at all, instead projecting images directly onto the retina with a complex array of LEDs and mirrors.
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    Reverse Listening Device by Dominic Wilcox

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    Gear  |  Projects


    Reverse Listening Device by Dominic Wilcox.
    "Here’s my second object for my Selfridges window at the Festival of Imagination. I thought to myself ‘what would it sound like if I could hear the things that happened on my left side through my right ear?’ So I decided to make this Reverse Listening Device, and it actually works. It sounds very strange and I now will wear it at all times."
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    Tales you Lose

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    Gear  |  Projects
    'Tales you Lose' project by Andre Levy, who turns ordinary coins into unique art pieces.
    "Coins are actually massively-reproduced little sculptures. This project brings individual character to each replica, and makes us think: Are we able to like one cent more than others, just by injecting new stories in it? "
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    Onewheel: The Self-Balancing Electric Skateboard

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    Gear  |  Projects


    The Onewheel is a self-balancing, single-wheeled electric skateboard that "gives you the feeling of flying". The deck can go as fast as 12 MPH, thank its 48V lithium battery you should be able to keep going for between four and six miles depending on the terrain. The Onewheel has already hit its Kickstarter target and sold out at the early $1,200 price.

    The 8-Bit Harmonica created by Japanese inventor Basami Sentaku

    Gear  |  Projects
    The 8-Bit Harmonica plays 80's classic games: Super Mario Bros...

    It's a glass cage that hangs more than 3,300 feet above the mountains.

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    Gear  |  Projects
    The installation is called 'Step Into the Void', it is a glass cage that hangs more than 3,300 feet above the mountains, on the top of 3km-high peak in Chamonix, , claiming it to be "the tallest attraction in Europe". The visitor wore slippers to protect the glass floor, visited the 'Step into the Void' installation at the Aiguille du Midi mountain peak above Chamonix. The project was designed by the French architect Pierre-Yves Chays, and took three years to see through to completion.
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    The sound of the earth

    Gear  |  Projects
    Here’s what it sounds like in the deepest accessible hole in the world.
    In Germany, a decades-old drilling site lets scientists (and one Dutch artist, Lotte Geeven) go much deeper—nearly 6 miles below the surface. And they’ve brought up a guttural voice from deep inside the Earth.
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    Hovering Tree Illusion by Daniel Siering and Mario Shu in Potsdam, Germany

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    Gear  |  Projects


    Hovering Tree Illusion by Daniel Siering and Mario Shu in Potsdam, Germany.
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    The Gap Mannequin Project - Man dresses like dummies and poses with them

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    Gear  |  Projects
    Steve Venegas's The Gap Mannequin Project.
    "Vancouver’s Steve Venegas has been dressing up like every mannequin publicly displayed in Gap stores, and posting the photos on his new blog The Gap Mannequin Project. Because according to him, “it’s funny to dress like a dummy.” We can’t help but agree. It’s also possible that he’s fallen in love with one of the mannequins, and this is the only way to win their heart."
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    AudioOrbs, the first and only speaker that you can enter.

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    Gear  |  Projects
    If you remember the Wall of Sound, which was the world’s largest speaker for the iPhone and iPod, the creators of the device have a new project in the works, called The Orb, another giant speaker, you can sit inside. There will just be two of The Orb speakers available, and each one will retail for $15,000 each,  they are being sold on Indiegogo.
    "Have you ever entered a small confined space you have also experienced the silence and solitude that you'll find inside. Spherical spaces almost completely blocks the noise from the outside world. This was our starting point when we developed the AudioOrbs. The first spherical speaker you can enter. Based on the Micasa Lab Cocoon developed by the same team we have fitted the AudoOrbs with speakers instead of storage modules.
     Fitted with Tempur pillows that adjust after the shape of your body ensures that not only the design gives the Orb a floating expression, you will feel like you are floating when inside the Orb.
    The 18 speakers mounted inside gives you a rich and full audio spectrum
    "
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    Lanzavecchia + Wai's Rocking Seat

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    Gear  |  Projects
    Designed by Lanzavecchia and Wai, the seat looks like a rocking horse.
    "With these Rockers, Lanzavecchia + Wai demonstrate how children’s play, through a sophisticated design process, can be transformed into refined grown-up objects with meaning and intent."
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    Work Worn Hand by Eliza Bennett

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    Gear  |  Projects
    Using her own skin as a canvas, British artist Eliza Bennett  has stitched into the palm of her hand using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. Considering the flesh as a base material, Bennett carefully stitches patterns and lines into the epidermis of her body using colored thread; ‘a woman’s work is never done’ results as an incredibly worn-looking hand, overworked and fatigued.
    "Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy."
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    A Wall of 300 Chairs and Clothes by Fumiko Kobayashi

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    Gear  |  Projects
    Artist Fumiko Kobayashi used about 300 chairs to create "1000 Legs, Cultivating Fruits," a huge wall built entirely out of chairs and some old clothing. One side of the wall is composed of used clothes, creating a relatively flat surface while the opposite side is all chairs – almost 300 chairs. The wall, currently on display at the Mori Art Museum through January 13 as part of a show called Roppongi Crossing, evokes Japan's post-tsunami devastation.
    "The clothes and chairs for the piece were all collected from the neighborhoods surrounding the museum and the artist’s home. When stacked together, it transforms into a force to be reckoned with."
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