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Miniature Food Sculptures

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1:12 scale food sculptures by Israeli artist Shay Aaron. You can see more photos on his flickr.
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CordCruncher Headphones

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CordCruncher Headphones by Jay Johnson.
CordCruncher Headphone is basically a set of earphones with an elastic sleeve for the cables, one end of which always remains within it. You can expose anywhere from 16 inches to 3.5 feet of cord. The left and right wires are held in an elastic sheath that can be worn as a necklace or bracelet. It’s a fully funded Kickstarter project. If you pledge at least US$20, you will receive a pair sometime in May.

Hexagonal Pewter Stool Molded From Beach Sand

Gear  |  Projects
By Max Lamb
"Inspired by a childhood spent on the beaches of Cornwall building castles, boats and tunnels in the sand, I decided to return to my favourite beach at Caerhays on the south coast of Cornwall to produce a stool using a primitive form of sand-casting. Molten pewter was poured into a sand mould sculpted directly into the beach by hand, and once cooled the sand was dug away to reveal a pewter stool."

Calories Bomb

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Calories Bomb by Raphael Volkmer.

Google Glasses: A New Way to Hurt Yourself (parody of Google's Project Glass)

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Google announced Project Glass yesterday, it allows users to wear Android-based display glasses to stream information right in front of their eyes. Tom Scott immediately saw the need for a parody of the Google Glass Project. The original video below.

Glass Hammer

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Glass Hammer by Alice Jung.

Human Face Video Mapping

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Samsung did something surprising: a mapped projection on an human face! This video uses exclusively the video mapping technique to build several characters on a human face. The images were projected directly over an actor, as in a canvas.

Galileo -  Remote-control platform for your iPhone

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Galileo is a OS-controlled robotic iPhone platform that allows you to control the viewing position of an iPhone 4/4S or iPod Touch (4th generation) remotely from your iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch or Web browser. Created by designers Josh Guyot and JoeBen Bevirt. Just swipe your finger on the screen of your iPad or other iOS device and Galileo reacts, orienting your iPhone or iPod Touch accordingly. The device is set to sell for $129.95, but if you back the project now you can snag one for just $85 at kickstarter.

CCTV

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CCTV

the world's largest deckchair

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The world's largest deckchair by artist Stuart Murdoch. The deckchair is 8.5metres tall and 5.5metres wide.

Cross-Stitch iPhone Cases

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These Cool Cross-Stitch iPhone Cases by the editor of purlbee.
I love the "Bird in a Tree'

One Tiny Hand

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One Tiny Hand by Zach Vitale who has replaced one tiny hand onto images of famous people.
"one tiny step for hands, one giant leap for mankind."

1 Second Everyday - Age 30

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By Cesar Kuriyama. He writes:
"I spent a couple of years saving enough money to be able to take a frugal year off from work my entire 30th year of life... I spent it doing all the important things I never had enough time for... travel, my own creative projects, & family."

The Sleeper Car

Gear  |  Projects
Improv Everywhere set up three beds, each outfitted with a comforter, pillow, and sheets. Pajamas, sleep masks, and earplugs were also provided as part of this unauthorized free service. The project took place on the above-ground N train in Astoria, Queens around midnight on a Sunday evening.

Internet of Things Camera

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The 'Internet of Things' Camera.
"What makes this combination way cooler than just a normal SD card or a USB cable to a computer is all the infrastructure provided by the Eye-Fi service — not just transferring images to your computer, but pushing them to your smartphone, photo-sharing sites like Flickr, issuing email or Twitter notifications, etc. This is all configured through the Eye-Fi application — there’s no additional coding required."